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Valdivian – Chorrera Stone Parrot Mortar

Valdivian – Chorrera Stone Parrot Mortar
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Valdivian – Chorrera Stone Parrot Mortar
Valdivian – Chorrera Stone Parrot Mortar
Valdivian – Chorrera Stone Parrot Mortar
Valdivian – Chorrera Stone Parrot Mortar
Valdivian – Chorrera Stone Parrot Mortar
Valdivian – Chorrera Stone Parrot Mortar
Valdivian – Chorrera Stone Parrot Mortar
Valdivian – Chorrera Stone Parrot Mortar

Intricate Details and Artistic Narrative of this

Valdivian – Chorrera Stone Mortar

 

Valdivian-Chorrera stone mortars shaped like parrots are artifacts from the Valdivian culture, which thrived in coastal Ecuador between 3500 BCE and 1800 BCE. The Valdivian culture is known for its intricate stone craftsmanship, particularly in the form of ceremonial objects and tools.

Scholars believe the parrot-shaped stone mortars held significant ceremonial or ritualistic importance in Valdivian-Chorrera culture. Evidence suggests these mortars were most likely adopted for ceremonial use or in a ritual setting and not used for everyday use. However, their distinct shape suggests they may have also held symbolic or spiritual significance.

The craftsmanship of these artifacts is remarkable, showcasing the skill and artistry of the Valdivian-Chorrera people. This greenish serpentine stone mortar is carved from a single piece of stone, with detailed attention to the parrot’s features, including its head, beak and tail, also emphasizing some lite incised marking on the body and around the eyes.

These artifacts provide valuable insights into the cultural practices and beliefs of the Valdivian-Chorrera society, shedding light on their reverence for nature, animals, and the spiritual world.

 Measures 9″ in Length.

Condition: Beak and one foot have been reattached otherwise in excellent condition.

Provenance: Ex – G. Landazuri, New York, NY

Similar example is exhibited at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Tx., Accession number 2004.1626

Price – POR

 


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Regional Division of Pre-Columbian Americas’ Major Archaeological Cultural Phases


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