Chimú Wooden Ceremonial Figure

Chimú Wooden Ceremonial Figure
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Chimú Wooden Ceremonial Figure
Chimú Wooden Ceremonial Figure
Chimú Wooden Ceremonial Figure
Chimú Wooden Ceremonial Figure
Chimú Wooden Ceremonial Figure
Chimú Wooden Ceremonial Figure

Intricate Details and Artistic Narrative of this

Chimú Wooden Figure

 

Highlighting the importance of marine resources in their diet, the Chimú culture of Peru depicted fish in their pottery and textiles. Due to their coastal location, the Chimú culture likely relied heavily on fish as a dietary staple. The consumption of fish provided a vital source of protein and essential nutrients for the Chimú people. Fish may have been prepared through various methods such as grilling, smoking, or drying to ensure preservation and availability throughout the year. Fish imagery often symbolized abundance, sustenance, and the interconnectedness of their coastal lifestyle with the sea. The representation of fish in Chimú art suggests a cultural emphasis on maritime activities and the importance of seafood in their culinary practices.
The Chimú people primarily sourced wood from local trees to create intricate art objects. They used wooden materials, such as Algarrobo and huapango, for carving and crafting. These materials were abundant in the coastal regions where the Chimú culture thrived. The use of wood in their art allowed for the creation of diverse items, including ceremonial objects, masks, and valuable items, showcasing their skill in woodworking and integrating natural resources into their artistic expressions.
The arid climate of this region has provided extraordinary conditions for preserving these archaeological materials.

This sizable and intricate sculpture depicts a Chiefton in ceremonial practice.
It is an impressive standalone wood carving. He wears a tethered headdress. Facial features are exaggerated. Eyes are wide as if in a hallucinogenic state. Measures 15.5″/39.37 cm in height on stand. 13.6.25″/23.60 cm without. Natural separation at base otherwise in excellent condition. Rich patina. West Coast, Peru. Ca. 1100 – 1450 A.D.

Price $2,850

 


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Regional Division of Pre-Columbian Americas’ Major Archaeological Cultural Phases

 


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